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house speaker john boehner both laid out ideas to avert the so-called fiscal cliff. tax increases and spending cuts are due to hit in january, but today it seemed the two leaders and the bipartisan deal are still worlds apart. steve handelsman is on capitol hill with more on that. steve? >> you got it right. this is a restart of a high-stakes negotiation between those two men. the president and the speaker. the problem is beginning today where they left off, which is far apart. in a speech at the white house, president obama claimed the election proved most americans agree with his plan. that he calls balanced. cutting spending and hiking taxes to avoid the fiscal cliff. he said he's flexible -- >> but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me making over $250,000 aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> reporter: he's calling in members of congress for fiscal cliff meetings next week. but the main republican negotiator, again, will be speaker joh
to the leaders is we need to work together to resolve this. i would point out that house speaker john boehner in his press conference yesterday echoed the president's sentiments to some extent saying he's willing to work with the president on the issue of taxes. that's the big issue here in washington. so signalling that he would be willing to work with the president. now, will this actually happen? of course, the republican conference is larger than the house, so speaker boehner is saying something in his conference going along with it are two different things. they're in a wait and see mode. we won't see the crisis of debt debate in the summer of 2011. >> i hope you're right. nationally syndicated host and msnbc contributor michael sikonis, and a.b. stott dard, social editor for the hill paper as well as the huffington post. sam stein with us. sam, let's start off with you. speaker boehner says he's open to tax revenue, also spending cuts. similar to the speaker boehner before some of the house republicans got ahold of him, and he basically pulled back on a deal struck with the president. >
with john boehner, the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell. is he planning on sitting down with those two republican leaders any time soon? is the white house saying? >> reporter: there's nothing announced for a leaders meeting so far. but i am certain, wolf, that that will be coming because there's such important negotiations ahead. i'm told that the president's conversation with speaker boehner was courteous, it was brief. and i'm told that they also discussed the importance of keeping their public statements vague or general enough so that they leave themselves enough private negotiating room to get a deal done to avoid the fiscal cliff, wolf. >> that's probably smart too. thanks very much for that, jessica. let's dig a little bit deeper right now with our chief political analyst gloria borger. isn't his responsibility right now though to take the first step, offer a proposal to boehner, to mcconnell, to the republicans? we assume that the democrats, nancy pelosi would go along and harry reid would go along with the president. >> well, i think as jessica's saying, the president bel
the house speaker, john boehner. he says he is willing to accept new revenue, but not from higher tax rates on wealthy americans, so where is the compromise here. what is the offering? >> well, exactly. i mean, that's what we were standing what we are several months back. both sides say they want to find common ground and both of them remain dug in over this big issue of taxes. they should have to share the burden of bringing down the dead, and let's listen more of what speaker boehner had to say in his speech yesterday. >>> certainly won't do in a lame-duck session of congress. it won't be solved simply by raising tacks or taking a plunge off the fiscal cliff. >> you mentioned they are open to new revenue, and it's very important where that revenue comes from, and it has to come from the right place. to him the right place is not raising taxes on higher earners, it's tax reform that would lower rates for everyone, and it's economic growth that would bring in more sales taxes and that sort of thing. >> harry reid says this is kicking it down the road, if you will. is there anything that's g
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)